Speakers and Abstracts

04 October 2021 (Monday)

“Analyzing novelty and prior experience through text analysis in movie ventures”
Prof. Dr. Alexander Kock (Technical University Darmstadt)

Abstract

Popular data analytics methods such as text analysis and social network analysis enable large scale and more objective measurements as well as new research questions in management research. In this study, we work on the question how new venture teams' composition (domain experience and social familiarity) relate to venture performance depending on the degree of venture novelty. For this, we use topic modeling on movie descriptions to measure domain experience and novelty, and prior social connections to derive a social familiarity measure.

About the Speaker

Alexander Kock is professor of technology and innovation management at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany. His research interests include organizational issues of innovation and project management, especially the management of innovation portfolios, highly innovative projects, the front end of innovation, and open innovation.

 

“AI-Emotion Recognition in the Wild and Explainable Interactive Machine Learning on Image Data”
Prof. Dr. Oliver Hinz (Goethe University Frankfurt)

Abstract

In this talk I will provide two examples for the capabilities of Machine Learning to analyze image data. In the first case study, I will demonstrate the potential of ML for medical diagnosis but will highlight the importance of Explainable AI methods and Human-in-the-loop concepts to arrive at meaningful results. The second case study from Marketing will show how standard smartphones can be used to predict the effectiveness from ads in a non-intrusive and easy-to-implement way.

About the Speaker

Oliver Hinz holds the Chair of Information Systems and Information Management at Goethe University Frankfurt. His research has been published in top journals like Information Systems Research (ISR), Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ), Journal of Marketing, Journal of Management Information Systems (JMIS), Decision Support Systems (DSS), Electronic Markets (EM), Business & Information Systems Engineering (BISE) and in a number of proceedings (e.g. ICIS, ECIS, PACIS).

 

“Machine Learning application”
Prof. Prithwiraj Choudhury (Harvard Business School)

Abstract

[TBC]

About the Speaker

Prithwiraj (Raj) Choudhury is the Lumry Family Associate Professor at the Harvard Business School. He was an Assistant Professor at Wharton prior to joining Harvard. His research is focused on studying the Future of Work, especially the changing Geography of Work. In particular, he studies the productivity effects of geographic mobility of workers, causes of geographic immobility and productivity effects of remote work practices such as ‘Work from anywhere’ and ‘All-remote’

 

“Design and (Visual) Optimal Distinctiveness”
Prof. Tian Heong Chan (Emory Goizueta Business School)

Abstract

How different should a new design be? We examine how a new design’s similarity with other designs contributes to its market valuation. Using a dataset of US design patents granted from 1977 through 2010 that are grouped into styles, we show that the market value for a new design decreases with its similarities to contemporary new designs (contemporary differentiation) but increases with its similarities to prior designs (past anchoring). Furthermore, designs so new as to fall into a new style suffers from a further value discount.

About the Speaker

Tian Chan is an assistant professor of Information Systems and Operations Management at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School. His research focuses on new product and service design.

 

 

05 October 2021 (TUESDAY)

Culture & Digital Ethnography
“Affordances and Platform Dynamics in Digital Ethnographic Research: Examples from Muslim Everyday Life on Instagram”
Dr. Simone Pfeifer (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz)

Abstract

Affordances and platform dynamics have often been studied as part of digital anthropological work (e.g., Costa 2018; Bareither 2018; Madianou & Miller 2012). However, these studies rarely mention how these affordances affect their digital research and how they have creatively responded to these dynamics. Drawing on examples from a digital team ethnography on Muslim everyday life on Instagram, I show how the dynamics and affordances of the platform have influenced the evolving of the research profile and became an important resource for reflection.

About the Speaker

Simone Pfeifer is a social and media anthropologist currently working as a post-doctoral researcher in the research project Jihadism on the Internet: Images and Videos, their Appropriation and Dissemination at the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany. Her work centers on social, visual, and digital practices and revolves around migration and mobility with a focus on transnational social relations between Senegal and Germany and Muslim everyday life in relation to German speaking social media.

 

“#TiktokAfrica as an Ethnographic field”
Tom Simmert (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz)

Abstract

Using the example of my research on Afrobeats, this talk aims to explore the possibilities of TikTok as a digital field site for ethnographic research in a (post-) pandemic context. It addresses the opportunities and challenges that arise for field participants and researchers alike, based on the affordances of the platform and its constant and dynamic development, which is as observable as it is opaque to its users.

About the Speaker

Tom Simmert is a doctoral candidate at Mainz University and a research fellow at CEDITRAA. His research interests include popular music, popular culture and celebrity in Nigeria.

 

 

“Ethnographic approaches to digital folklore”
Dr. Gabriele de Seta (University of Bergen)

Abstract

With its focus on sustained participation and dialogic engagement across different media and their contexts of use, ethnography is particularly suited for the study of digital folklore. In this talk, I outline four strategies to approach digital folklore ethnographically. These strategies build on extensive methodological debates and aim at fine-tuning the existing framework of digital ethnography for the study of vernacular content and practices emerging on digital media.

About the Speaker

Gabriele de Seta is, technically, a sociologist. He holds a PhD from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica in Taipei. Gabriele is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Bergen, where he is part of the ERC-funded project “Machine Vision in Everyday Life”.

 

“Hybrid ethnography of expressive cultures, collection and utilization of audiovisual data”
Assoc. Prof. Liz Przybylski (University of California)

Abstract

This talk shares examples from hybrid online/offline music ethnography that will help listeners ask theoretical, ethical, and practical questions about modes of sharing information. Thinking through online music festivals and work with nonprofit artist groups, we discuss types, purposes, and audiences for varied research products. We bridge from a discussion of making and sharing multimodal media with research collaborators into questions that can be applied to listeners’ own research projects.

About the Speaker

Dr. Liz Przybylski is an interdisciplinary popular music scholar who specializes in hip hop practices in the United States and Canada. An Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of California, Riverside, she is the author of Hybrid Ethnography (SAGE, 2020). Recent and forthcoming publications in academic journals and edited volumes focus on her on- and off-line hybrid ethnographic research in Indigenous hip hop as well as popular music pedagogy.